Elite Equine and Retiring your Horse

 
22 July 2019 - Elite Equine and retiring your horse.jpg

RETIRING YOUR HORSE

A few Doctors of Veterinary medicine gives much needed advice if you are considering retiring your horse:

“Retirement for most horses is a fairly informal process.

The best way to retire a horse is to gradually decrease his activity level, based on his changing physical abilities. But it's not always easy to decide when to make those adjustments and to what extent. 

Judging whether an off day is a minor bump in the road or part of a larger decline in your horse's health, and continually making adjustments in his management and lifestyle that can help him stay healthy and happy is really a fine balance, full of uncertainty and sometimes fraught with emotion. But it's something that every older horse deserves.

Good advice would be to follow the horse's lead in slowly reducing his workload. 

‘If your horse isn't handling the rocky, mountainous trails well anymore, stick to the hills. And then when the hills are too much, ride the flat trails. Eventually, if he's got the personality, he may just be led around with kids on his back, but that's an important job, too.’ 

The same years that took a physical toll on your horse may have made him a calm, experienced schoolmaster, perfect for younger or inexperienced riders.

Simply looking at an older horse daily will go a long way toward keeping him healthy. ‘You should visit him and groom him every day. If you're just casually throwing hay and water at him each day and not taking the time to run your hands over his body, you could miss something.’

Consistency is important, too. If your horse received an oral joint supplement while he was working, continue to give it in retirement. In retirement his needs will be different, but still important.” [1]

Elite Equine 100% organic rosehip supplement will be a valuable addition to your horse’s care through his whole life.

To read more or to place an order, https://ofw.one/elite-equine-supplements

[1] https://equusmagazine.com/management/easing-your-horse-into-retirement-8550